Nuremberg

View from Nuremberg Castle

The Palace of Justice and Courtroom 600

During the time Maxwell Fyfe spent in Nuremberg, the Palace of Justice was the place he spent most of his time. It was where he worked with the British prosecution team, bringing more than 20 Nazi defendants to account after the Second World War. The trials took place between 1945 – 46 and during that time, Maxwell Fyfe cross-examined Joachimm von Ribbentrop, Field Marshall Kietel and Grand Admirals Raeder and Doenitz and most famously, Hermann Georing. In a letter home to his wife, Sylvia, Maxwell Fyfe wrote of his work saying 'My part is partly conducting a seemingly unending international conference, partly running a small department and lastly getting up a case for trial.' The Courthouse and surrounding area are described in detail as is the process leading up to the start of the Trials. He explains why Nuremberg was chosen for the Trial saying 'For our purposes….the Provincial Court House, with numerous rooms in addition to the Court itself, and the adjacent prison, was obviously suitable...On practical grounds, as well as from the ideological standpoint of being the place where the Nazis had held their Party Rallies, Nuremberg seemed a good choice.' At the time Maxwell Fyfe was in Nuremberg, the town was still heavily affected by bombing and even the Palace of Justice was affected. Describing the Palace on his first visit, he says 'The Palace of Justice in Nuremberg had received some bomb damage and required fairly extensive repairs.' And goes on describe the courtroom's transformation from 'dark, solemn and old fashioned' to a large enough court to fit all those who worked there including Judges, defence and tables for each of the four prosecution teams from Britain, France, Russia and America. The Trials are now commemorated in a permanent exhibition attached to the Court Room and make sure the job the Trials did are not forgotten, 70 years on.

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Inside Courtroom 600

'The Palace of Justice in Nuremberg had received some bomb damage and required fairly extensive repairs. A more difficult problem was, however, the court itself. There was a dark, solemn, and old fashioned court room which had been big enough for local cases but it was quite insufficient for this trial.'
from David Maxwell-Fyfe's autobiography, Political Adventure

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No. 7 Geothestrasse, Zirndorf

'The villas occupied by the British team were in the township of Zirndorf some seven kilometres to the SW. The villa which I shared was at 7 Geothestrasse and had formerly been occupied by the burgomeister of Zirndorf.'
from David Maxwell-Fyfe's autobiography, Political Adventure

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N Pan

Bridge over the Pegnitz

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