Dornoch and the East Highlands

Dornoch Firth

Dornoch

David Maxwell-Fyfe's mother, Isabella, was born in Dornoch to Janet and David Fraser. Their house overlooked the square where in 1955, Maxwell-Fyfe was made a Freeman of the town. It is a beautiful village which has many attributes that we discovered when we visited. The village is built around Dornoch Cathedral, a 13th century cathedral, in the square and away from the main village, you find yourself at the sea and surrounded by golf courses. Dornoch was known to Maxwell-Fyfe as his place of holiday and held warm memories for him.

View from the high street edit

The High Street, Dornoch

'In April I had another experience which was very moving to me. Dornoch, the Royal Burgh in which my mother had been born, made me a Freeman...I drove to Dornoch and was piped into the centre of the burgh with my own music 'Kilmuir's Return to Dornoch'. The ceremony was in the open air, in the square between the castle and the Cathedral, on which the windows of my grandfather's house, where my mother was born, look out.'
from David Maxwell-Fyfe's autobiography, Political Adventure

Click on a small image to enlarge

Panoramic edit

Kilmuir Easter

'I had thought of calling myself Creich from the little place in Sutherland with a ruined chapel, the graveyard of which contains the bones of my forebears. Sylvia said that she was not going to spend her declining years spelling her name to the butcher's assistants, so I called myself 'Kilmuir' with the 'of Creich' not part of the title.'
from David Maxwell-Fyfe's autobiography, Political Adventure

Click on a small image to enlarge

panoramic edit

Creich

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